Does Homeschooling Your Child Make Sense? Here’s What to Think About

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father home schooling his daughter

In case you’re living under a rock, you may have come across the information that the latest singing sensation Billie Eilish, as well as her older brother and frequent collaborator, Finneas, have been homeschooled by their parents.

The American pop star and her older brother were homeschooled by their actor parents, giving them time to enroll in music, arts, and dance school and participate in activities that involve creativity and self-expression. As you can tell from current entertainment news and perhaps a Google search, both are world-famous musicians now, winning awards from left to right, and are probably raking in millions.

If you’re a parent yourself, you’re probably thinking right now that homeschooling is not such a bad idea after all. After all, many have taken the plunge: From just 10,000 in the 1980s, there are now 1.7 million homeschooled students in the United States. Hold your horses, though, as you may want to consider your options and examine whether it’s the right learning route for your kid.

Below are some thoughts to consider:

Location, location, location

How far is the school from your home? If you had to drive several miles away, and it takes up a lot of your time from work, family life, and play, then you may be better off homeschooling your child. Traveling long distances to-and-fro may also be just as physically taxing for you little tyke; both of you could benefit from some extra rest.

A disability or shyness

Children with autism, attention deficit disorder, dyslexia can encounter some difficulties in functioning inside the classroom. Homeschooling can limit your child’s exposure to distractions and will allow you to enhance their learning experience as well.

Relationships vs. time

mother homeschooling her childParents who homeschool their kids have better relationships with them, that much is true. However, if you’re running a business yourself or have a full-time office work, the demands of homeschooling your kid may interfere at some point. It all boils down to how you manage your time, though.

If you’re a parent yourself or an enterprising one who’s looking for a new business venture, tutoring franchise opportunities are increasingly growing in popularity. From foreign language learning to academic tutoring and test prep, there has been a growing demand for tutors in recent years as the world becomes ever more globalized.

As compared with a traditional school that you have to build from scratch, tutoring franchises operate on an established business and marketing model that was tried and tested by the originators. This means that little work has to be done on your part as you set up, as the franchisor will do the majority of the work for you at the outset. The real work will only start once the keys to your tutoring school have been handed to you.

Homeschooling one’s kids indeed have its pros and cons. In the end, it all depends on one’s parenting style, goals for their kids, and their kids’ own inclinations. Hopefully this article answered all your questions. If not, you can always get in touch with a tutoring or educational support consultant to learn more about homeschooling and the rigors of teaching.